Career Guidance & Counseling

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The Ministries of Labour and Ministry of Education and Higher Education responsible for TVET, have decided to reform the existing TVET system into a unified, flexible and labour market demand oriented one. However, the career guidance is one of the most highlighted components of this initiative that aims at enabling the youth to explore their aptitude and abilities as well as exploring training opportunities. In partnership with the two ministries, the GTZ shall establish a national system for career guidance and counseling involving all relevant partners.

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‘If you’re helping youth build successful futures, then chances are you’re working with them on themes of career guidance and counseling. For the purpose of this development efforts, we define career development broadly as the lifelong process of managing youth learning (both formal and informal), work (both paid and unpaid) and transitions in order to build toward their preferred future. Policy makers, along with parents, family members, employers and other community members, have an important role to play in helping youth manage their own career development.

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Overall Definition: Many definitions exist for career guidance and counseling. But, the comprehensive definition is: ‘Career guidance is defined as services and activities intended to assist individuals of any age throughout their lives to make educational, training and occupational choices and to manage their career according to their aptitudes and abilities and labour market needs’. The definition of career guidance also includes assisting people to reflect on their aspiration, interests, competencies, personal attribution, qualifications and abilities and to match them with available training and employment opportunities
Source: OECD, 2004 and Council of the European Union, 2004
 

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Involves personalizing information to suit the particular needs of the individual. The success of guidance hinges on gaining specific information about the individual by means of formal and informal assessment processes, and then providing information chosen for its relevance to that person. Interaction between guidance practitioners and their clients often takes the form of an interview, or information gathering process that establishes the type of information the guidance practitioner will provide. The focus of the exchange, and the direction of the interview are determined by the client’s needs and do not reflect the practitioner’s interests alone.

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Is an interpersonal process that moves beyond providing client-relevant information to broader issues such as career development and the integration of life and education roles with work roles. It involves exploring the other person’s point of view, tentatively offering other angles for consideration and discussing possible action planning with the client. Career counseling helps individuals achieve greater self-awareness, develop a life/work direction, increase their understanding of learning, education and work opportunities, and become more self-directed in managing learning, education, work and transitions. It facilitates the acquisition of skills, interests, beliefs, values, work habits, and personal qualities enabling each individual to create a satisfying life in constantly changing cultural, social, and work environments.

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The old model of career development involved a process of administering a battery of standardized tests to young people, telling them what they should be based on the results, and then pointing them toward achieving that outcome. That model is outdated. Career development now looks at the whole person.  It doesn't separate work from life; neither does it expect youth to decide what they're going to be for the rest of their lives. Rather, it recognizes that the facets of life have an impact on each other, and that career development is a continuous, daily process. While the new model of career development is more complex than the old one, it is also much more holistic and more likely to work.

 

Career development today is about helping youth (and adults) to:

  • Believe in themselves and future prospects
  • Understand the labour market and opportunities for work and learning
  •  Know themselves
  •  Build key attitudes and skills
  •  Make decisions and plans for now
  • Search for and/or develop work
  • Maintain success and manage transitions

 

Many young people, however, do not see their own potential and their ability to build their future. Because they don’t envision much of a future, things like discovering self, researching opportunity, planning and other proactive endeavors aren't particularly inspiring.  In some ways, believing in self is the impediment for everything else in career development.  Not much will happen unless this belief exists.  Fortunately, almost all young people have some capacity and want to believe in themselves, and this reflect can stimulate into a development that grasp other fundamental personal maturity.  However, young people don’t need to know everything about the labour market, but in order to set meaningful and realistic career directions, they do need to have some sense of the range of possibilities for work and learning that might be available to them.

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The role of CGC is to offering services and activities for school, university and college students, trainees in training (TVET) institutions to assist them to identify their career perspectives and objectives. In particular to provide individual and groups guidance to assist to decide about further academic or vocational education and training, select suitable jobs, change jobs or return to work by improving employability. CGC services are also to be provided in public employment services, in the workplace, in the voluntary or community sector and in the private sector.
Hence, Career Guidance and Counseling promotes the following goals:

  •  Lifelong guidance
  • Support employment
  • Social and economic development for all

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Career guidance shall serve:

  •  Students of basic education (until 10th grade)
  • Students of academic secondary education
  • Students of vocational secondary education
  • Students of post secondary or higher education
  • Job seekers, graduates, unemployed, dropouts and those who are endangered with unemployment
  • Women with special interests to participate in the labour market
  • Parents of youths

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CGC include: career information provision (in print, ITC based and other forms), assessment and self-assessment tools, counseling interviews, career education programmes (to help individuals develop their self-awareness, opportunity awareness and career management skills), employment counseling including work search programmes and transition services.

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  • Transparency and ease of access over the lifespan, including the capacity to meet the needs of a diverse range of clients.
  •  Attention to key transition points over the lifespan.
  • Flexibility and innovation in service delivery to reflect the differing needs and circumstances of diverse client groups.
  • Processes to stimulate individuals to engage in regular review and planning.
  • Access to individual guidance by appropriately qualified practitioners for those who need such help, at times when they need it.
  • Programmes for all young people to develop their career management skills.
  • Opportunities to investigate and experience learning and work options before choosing them
  • Access to service delivery that is independent of the interests of particular institutions or enterprises.
  • Access to comprehensive and integrated educational, occupational and labour market information.
  • Active involvement of relevant stakeholders

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